A Better Story

by Glynn Harrison     |     Book Summary


Author: Glynn Harrison
Publisher: IVP
Date: January 19, 2017
Pages: 236

Book Summary of A Better Story by Glynn Harrison


The cultural shift over the past 20-50 years has been breathtaking in its scope and speed. From a culture which broadly accepted a Christian morality of sex and marriage, we have witnessed a revolution that has seemingly changed everything.

Christians do not only find themselves holding a minority moral opinion but one that is viewed as threatening and even immoral by the prevailing culture.

What has driven this moral revolution? Most of all, it has harnessed the moral power of story, making bold promises of a better world.

Meanwhile, Christians have been left behind, still battling a subculture of shame where sex is concerned, tripping over the plausibility structures that have been built against them rendering their arguments ineffective and, above all, failing to spot the power of narrative in the so-called culture war.

But what if we didn’t fail here? What if we were able to grasp with joy the better story that Christianity has to tell, of humanity created as sexual beings in God’s image, who flourish when they live according to His design?

It’s a powerful story — one worth pondering.





A Better Story

by Glynn Harrison

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of A Better Story by Glynn Harrison

AuthorGlynn Harrison
PublisherIVP
DateJanuary 19, 2017
Pages236


Overview:

The cultural shift over the past 20-50 years has been breathtaking in its scope and speed. From a culture which broadly accepted a Christian morality of sex and marriage, we have witnessed a revolution that has seemingly changed everything.

Christians do not only find themselves holding a minority moral opinion but one that is viewed as threatening and even immoral by the prevailing culture.

What has driven this moral revolution? Most of all, it has harnessed the moral power of story, making bold promises of a better world.

Meanwhile, Christians have been left behind, still battling a subculture of shame where sex is concerned, tripping over the plausibility structures that have been built against them rendering their arguments ineffective and, above all, failing to spot the power of narrative in the so-called culture war.

But what if we didn’t fail here? What if we were able to grasp with joy the better story that Christianity has to tell, of humanity created as sexual beings in God’s image, who flourish when they live according to His design?

It’s a powerful story — one worth pondering.