Baptists in America

by Thomas S. Kidd & Barry Hankins     |     Book Summary


Author: Thomas S. Kidd & Barry Hankins
Publisher: Oxford
Date: 2015
Pages: 329

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


“In America, Baptists were once the ultimate religious outsiders.” (p. ix) They were mocked by the Puritans and originally banned from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. They were regularly “reviled, fined, and sometimes brutalized by authorities in England and in the American colonies” (p. ix). 

However, over the span of some three hundred years, Baptists became the largest Protestant denomination in the United States. Not only have Baptists grown numerically, but Baptists have grown in cultural influence. Men like Billy Graham and Rick Warren, both Baptists, have often been referred to as “America’s pastor” (p. ix). Additionally, Baptists control “publishing houses, missions organizations, disaster relief agencies, advocacy groups…and a good deal more” (p. ix).

Once the epitome of religious outsider, “Baptists have become religious and cultural insiders” (p. ix). This is particularly true in the South, where Baptist churches continue to wield incredible cultural power. Ironically, most Baptists continue to feel like persecuted, marginalized outsiders. This “enduring feeling of being under attack” (p. x) has allowed Baptists “to be vigilant and to flourish” (p. x) well into the twenty first-century.





Baptists in America

by Thomas S. Kidd & Barry Hankins

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

AuthorThomas S. Kidd & Barry Hankins
PublisherOxford
Date2015
Pages329


Overview:

“In America, Baptists were once the ultimate religious outsiders.” (p. ix) They were mocked by the Puritans and originally banned from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. They were regularly “reviled, fined, and sometimes brutalized by authorities in England and in the American colonies” (p. ix). 

However, over the span of some three hundred years, Baptists became the largest Protestant denomination in the United States. Not only have Baptists grown numerically, but Baptists have grown in cultural influence. Men like Billy Graham and Rick Warren, both Baptists, have often been referred to as “America’s pastor” (p. ix). Additionally, Baptists control “publishing houses, missions organizations, disaster relief agencies, advocacy groups…and a good deal more” (p. ix).

Once the epitome of religious outsider, “Baptists have become religious and cultural insiders” (p. ix). This is particularly true in the South, where Baptist churches continue to wield incredible cultural power. Ironically, most Baptists continue to feel like persecuted, marginalized outsiders. This “enduring feeling of being under attack” (p. x) has allowed Baptists “to be vigilant and to flourish” (p. x) well into the twenty first-century.




Limited-time Lifetime Membership Deal: