Biblical Authority After Babel

by Kevin Vanhoozer     |     Book Summary


Author: Kevin Vanhoozer
Publisher: Brazos Press
Date: September 19, 2018
Pages: 286

Book Summary of Biblical Authority After Babel by Kevin Vanhoozer


The Protestant Reformation places a heavy emphasis on the priesthood of all believers and posits that the Bible alone is the sole source of infallible authority for the Christian. But what happens when individual believers, each reading Scripture under the supposed guidance of the Holy Spirit, disagree with one another? 

With the removal of a governing interpretive body such as Rome, many modern scholars have equated the Protestant Reformation with Babel, only “the Reformation resulted in a confusion not of languages but of interpretations, authorities, and interpretive communities” (p. x). This begs the question: Has the Protestant Reformation done more harm than good for the kingdom of God?

A proper retrieval of the core principles of the Reformation, the five solas, leads not to interpretive anarchy, but instead to a deeper insight into the one true gospel. Resultantly, a “Mere Protestant Christianity” (p. 31) is developed, which retrieves “the solas as guidelines and guardrails of biblical interpretation” (p. 32) and restores “the place of the church in the pattern of theological authority” (p. 32).





Biblical Authority After Babel

by Kevin Vanhoozer

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Biblical Authority After Babel by Kevin Vanhoozer

AuthorKevin Vanhoozer
PublisherBrazos Press
DateSeptember 19, 2018
Pages286


Overview:

The Protestant Reformation places a heavy emphasis on the priesthood of all believers and posits that the Bible alone is the sole source of infallible authority for the Christian. But what happens when individual believers, each reading Scripture under the supposed guidance of the Holy Spirit, disagree with one another? 

With the removal of a governing interpretive body such as Rome, many modern scholars have equated the Protestant Reformation with Babel, only “the Reformation resulted in a confusion not of languages but of interpretations, authorities, and interpretive communities” (p. x). This begs the question: Has the Protestant Reformation done more harm than good for the kingdom of God?

A proper retrieval of the core principles of the Reformation, the five solas, leads not to interpretive anarchy, but instead to a deeper insight into the one true gospel. Resultantly, a “Mere Protestant Christianity” (p. 31) is developed, which retrieves “the solas as guidelines and guardrails of biblical interpretation” (p. 32) and restores “the place of the church in the pattern of theological authority” (p. 32).