Black and Reformed

by Anthony J. Carter     |     Book Summary


Author: Anthony J. Carter
Publisher: P&R Publishing
Date: 2016
Pages: 157

Book Summary of Black and Reformed by Anthony J. Carter


For many, “black and reformed” is an oxymoron. To be African American means dealing with the racist past that plagued America — even in the church. To make matters worse, black theology is often only associated with the black liberation theology that was spawned in the 1960s. However, black theology is not monolithic, and the history of African American Christianity shows some similarities between black theology and reformed theology.

Reformed theology is biblical, historical, and experiential. However, many reformed Christians and pastors allowed cultural norms to influence them, which ended up hurting their African American brothers. Since American Christianity left out the black experience and perspective for centuries, white and black Christians now need to join hands and listen to one another.

Can black Christians be Reformed? Certainly! Could Reformed theology benefit from black voices? Definitely! As black Christians embrace Reformed theology, they can learn from Reformed history and teaching while sharing a unique and godly perspective on race and the gospel.





Black and Reformed

by Anthony J. Carter

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Black and Reformed by Anthony J. Carter

AuthorAnthony Carter
PublisherP&R Publishing
Date2016
Pages157


Overview:

For many, “black and reformed” is an oxymoron. To be African American means dealing with the racist past that plagued America — even in the church. To make matters worse, black theology is often only associated with the black liberation theology that was spawned in the 1960s. However, black theology is not monolithic, and the history of African American Christianity shows some similarities between black theology and reformed theology.

Reformed theology is biblical, historical, and experiential. However, many reformed Christians and pastors allowed cultural norms to influence them, which ended up hurting their African American brothers. Since American Christianity left out the black experience and perspective for centuries, white and black Christians now need to join hands and listen to one another.

Can black Christians be Reformed? Certainly! Could Reformed theology benefit from black voices? Definitely! As black Christians embrace Reformed theology, they can learn from Reformed history and teaching while sharing a unique and godly perspective on race and the gospel.