City of God, Part I

by Augustine of Hippo     |     Book Summary


Author: Augustine of Hippo
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Date: Early 5th Century
Pages: 1091

Book Summary of City of God, Part I by Augustine of Hippo


Augustine here outlines a critique of the Roman culture and philosophy of his day, thoroughly exploring and exposing the pagan pantheon for all of its various inconsistencies and incoherence. 

Following Rome’s official conversion to Christianity and the sack of Rome by the Visigoths in 410, the hostilities between pagans and Christians reached an apex. Augustine articulated these hostilities and the dynamics between the two religions with an eye toward refuting pagan theology and championing Christian thought.

For much of City of God (Part I), Augustine engaged with the work of other philosophers. Primarily, though, Augustine outlined, praised, and attacked the philosophy of Plato and his followers. The Platonists, a Greek sect of philosophers with continuing influence on the Roman world, resembled Christianity in many ways, and Augustine saw their thought as being highly elevated in the realms of metaphysics and ethics. Specific theological assertions about the plurality of pagan gods and the relationship between angels, demons, God, and men provided points of tension and contention that Augustine addressed with meticulous care. 

By the conclusion, Augustine saw himself as having refuted much of the theological doctrine of the Roman pagans, supplanting it with a clearly superior Christian vision of reality. Now, having attacked the pagans, Augustine had laid the foundation for City of God, Part II where he analyzed the cities of God and Men and “their origin, their development, and their destined ends” (p. 416).





City of God, Part I

by Augustine of Hippo

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of City of God, Part I by Augustine of Hippo

AuthorAugustine of Hippo
PublisherPenguin Classics
DateEarly 5th Century
Pages1091


Overview:

Augustine here outlines a critique of the Roman culture and philosophy of his day, thoroughly exploring and exposing the pagan pantheon for all of its various inconsistencies and incoherence. 

Following Rome’s official conversion to Christianity and the sack of Rome by the Visigoths in 410, the hostilities between pagans and Christians reached an apex. Augustine articulated these hostilities and the dynamics between the two religions with an eye toward refuting pagan theology and championing Christian thought.

For much of City of God (Part I), Augustine engaged with the work of other philosophers. Primarily, though, Augustine outlined, praised, and attacked the philosophy of Plato and his followers. The Platonists, a Greek sect of philosophers with continuing influence on the Roman world, resembled Christianity in many ways, and Augustine saw their thought as being highly elevated in the realms of metaphysics and ethics. Specific theological assertions about the plurality of pagan gods and the relationship between angels, demons, God, and men provided points of tension and contention that Augustine addressed with meticulous care. 

By the conclusion, Augustine saw himself as having refuted much of the theological doctrine of the Roman pagans, supplanting it with a clearly superior Christian vision of reality. Now, having attacked the pagans, Augustine had laid the foundation for City of God, Part II where he analyzed the cities of God and Men and “their origin, their development, and their destined ends” (p. 416).




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