Confessions

by Augustine of Hippo     |     Book Summary


Author: Augustine of Hippo
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Date: 397 AD (this version, 2008)
Pages: 353

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


Augustine’s Confessions is considered by many to be one of the greatest works in the history of Western thought. One of the only surviving autobiographies from the period, his thoughtful examination of his own life provides us not only with a detailed account of life in the 4th century AD, but a spiritual testimony of timeless power and a profound philosophical and theological treatise. 

Spanning from his birth to the time of the book’s writing, Confessions covers Augustine’s behavior and various mental states in childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, and manhood, all the way into his middle-aged years. 

For most of those stages, Augustine was steeped deeply in the sin of the world. Entirely unable to pull himself from the mire of wickedness, he continually strayed further and further from God — especially, his penchant for sexual pleasure and ambition for worldly success delayed his ultimate salvation.

Through relentless spiritual and intellectual trials, Augustine eventually managed to escape his enslavement to the flesh and dedicated his life to contemplation, prayer, writing, and asceticism.





Confessions

by Augustine of Hippo

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

AuthorAugustine of Hippo
PublisherPenguin Classics
Date397 AD (this version, 2008)
Pages353


Overview:

Augustine’s Confessions is considered by many to be one of the greatest works in the history of Western thought. One of the only surviving autobiographies from the period, his thoughtful examination of his own life provides us not only with a detailed account of life in the 4th century AD, but a spiritual testimony of timeless power and a profound philosophical and theological treatise. 

Spanning from his birth to the time of the book’s writing, Confessions covers Augustine’s behavior and various mental states in childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, and manhood, all the way into his middle-aged years. 

For most of those stages, Augustine was steeped deeply in the sin of the world. Entirely unable to pull himself from the mire of wickedness, he continually strayed further and further from God — especially, his penchant for sexual pleasure and ambition for worldly success delayed his ultimate salvation.

Through relentless spiritual and intellectual trials, Augustine eventually managed to escape his enslavement to the flesh and dedicated his life to contemplation, prayer, writing, and asceticism.




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