Fool’s Talk

by Os Guinness     |     Book Summary


Author: Os Guinness
Publisher: IVP Books
Date: July 4, 2015
Pages: 270

Book Summary of Fool's Talk by Os Guinness


Apologetics. There’s a word the average believer isn’t using over lunch today. But, “we are all apologists” (p. 15). That is, apologetics is simply the defense of one’s worldview, and everybody, either directly through communication or indirectly simply in the way they live, defends their worldview. Everyone is an apologist in one way or another.

For the 21st century Christian, apologetics should matter immensely because of the interconnectedness of today’s world. Not only are there competing worldviews, but these worldviews are broadcast today in a way like never before (think movies, television, and the internet). Christians should care, and Christians should have an answer.

That answer is not merely a “defense” of the faith but a desire to persuade others of the truth of Scripture. As a whole, “we have lost the art of Christian persuasion and we must recover it” (p. 17). In this way, apologetics should not be separated from evangelism and discipleship. If believers really want to make disciples, they must be serious about apologetics and the art of Christian persuasion. 

At the end of the day, the art of apologetics isn’t about winning an argument or scoring debate points — it’s about loving God and loving others and seeing people come to Christ for their good and His glory.





Fool’s Talk

by Os Guinness

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Fool's Talk by Os Guinness

AuthorOs Guinness
PublisherIVP Books
DateJuly 4, 2015
Pages270


Overview:

Apologetics. There’s a word the average believer isn’t using over lunch today. But, “we are all apologists” (p. 15). That is, apologetics is simply the defense of one’s worldview, and everybody, either directly through communication or indirectly simply in the way they live, defends their worldview. Everyone is an apologist in one way or another.

For the 21st century Christian, apologetics should matter immensely because of the interconnectedness of today’s world. Not only are there competing worldviews, but these worldviews are broadcast today in a way like never before (think movies, television, and the internet). Christians should care, and Christians should have an answer.

That answer is not merely a “defense” of the faith but a desire to persuade others of the truth of Scripture. As a whole, “we have lost the art of Christian persuasion and we must recover it” (p. 17). In this way, apologetics should not be separated from evangelism and discipleship. If believers really want to make disciples, they must be serious about apologetics and the art of Christian persuasion. 

At the end of the day, the art of apologetics isn’t about winning an argument or scoring debate points — it’s about loving God and loving others and seeing people come to Christ for their good and His glory.