How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth

by Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart     |     Book Summary


Author: Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart
Publisher: Zondervan
Date: November 9, 2003 (Third Edition)
Pages: 264

Book Summary of How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth by Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart


The Bible is the most widely read book in the history of mankind. It’s also the most misread book in human existence. How can a book so valuable, yet so often misunderstood, be read, comprehended, and treasured rightly? In step Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart.

The Bible is composed of 66 individual books written by about 40 different authors over the course of 1500 years or so. These books span a variety of cultural contexts, intended audiences, and literary genres. All of this may sound rather intimidating at first, but the reality is, the Bible is meant to be read by everybody.

If readers make the effort to think about the types of literature found in the Bible and the contexts in which these books were written, they will find themselves reading the Bible for all its worth. After all, the Bible is “better than gold, even much fine gold;
sweeter also than honey and drippings of the honeycomb” (Psa. 19:10).

This book, therefore, is a useful tool for anyone who wants to truly understand the inerrant, infallible, authoritative, and sufficient Word of God.





How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth

by Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth by Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart

AuthorGordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart
PublisherZondervan
DateNovember 9, 2003 (Third Edition)
Pages264


Overview:

The Bible is the most widely read book in the history of mankind. It’s also the most misread book in human existence. How can a book so valuable, yet so often misunderstood, be read, comprehended, and treasured rightly? In step Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart.

The Bible is composed of 66 individual books written by about 40 different authors over the course of 1500 years or so. These books span a variety of cultural contexts, intended audiences, and literary genres. All of this may sound rather intimidating at first, but the reality is, the Bible is meant to be read by everybody.

If readers make the effort to think about the types of literature found in the Bible and the contexts in which these books were written, they will find themselves reading the Bible for all its worth. After all, the Bible is “better than gold, even much fine gold;
sweeter also than honey and drippings of the honeycomb” (Psa. 19:10).

This book, therefore, is a useful tool for anyone who wants to truly understand the inerrant, infallible, authoritative, and sufficient Word of God.