Images and Idols

by Thomas J. Terry and J. Ryan Lister     |     Book Summary


Author: Thomas J. Terry and J. Ryan Lister
Publisher: Moody
Date: 2018
Pages: 160

Book Summary of Images and Idols by Thomas J. Terry and J. Ryan Lister


Some people think that Christianity and art don’t mix. They have seen one of two scenarios:

  1. Christians have tried to do art, but it was really just a low-quality, cheap imitation of the world’s creativity. Instead of emphasizing quality, they made sure to keep the ‘Jesus count’ high so that people would hear the gospel.
  2. Christians have tried to do art, but ended up more focused on their art than their faith. In attempts to be creative, they sacrificed their methods and their missions for the sake of mastering their craft.

Neither has to be the case. We have to realize that creativity “not only comes from God, but also is for God” (p. 17, emphasis in original). In other words, we need to make the highest quality art we can make without losing focus of what ultimately matters — the glory of God.

When we have our sights set on God and not our art or our success, our images won’t become idols for us to worship. Rather, we will put ourselves and our creativity in their proper places. Our creativity will be used for our Creator.





Images and Idols

by Thomas J. Terry and J. Ryan Lister

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Images and Idols by Thomas J. Terry and J. Ryan Lister

AuthorThomas J. Terry and J. Ryan Lister
PublisherMoody
Date2018
Pages160


Overview:

Some people think that Christianity and art don’t mix. They have seen one of two scenarios:

  1. Christians have tried to do art, but it was really just a low-quality, cheap imitation of the world’s creativity. Instead of emphasizing quality, they made sure to keep the ‘Jesus count’ high so that people would hear the gospel.
  2. Christians have tried to do art, but ended up more focused on their art than their faith. In attempts to be creative, they sacrificed their methods and their missions for the sake of mastering their craft.

Neither has to be the case. We have to realize that creativity “not only comes from God, but also is for God” (p. 17, emphasis in original). In other words, we need to make the highest quality art we can make without losing focus of what ultimately matters — the glory of God.

When we have our sights set on God and not our art or our success, our images won’t become idols for us to worship. Rather, we will put ourselves and our creativity in their proper places. Our creativity will be used for our Creator.