Introducing Tyndale

by William Tyndale, John Piper, Robert J. Sheehan     |     Book Summary


Author: William Tyndale, John Piper, Robert J. Sheehan
Publisher: The Banner of Truth Trust
Date: 2017
Pages: 103

Book Summary of Introducing Tyndale by William Tyndale, John Poper, Robert J. Sheehan


Martyr, translator, and banished theologian William Tyndale would suffer for the cause of liberty and pure Christianity so that every man, woman, and child in England could know and understand the Word of God unadulterated by the interpretations of priests and bishops. He would never have a family, and he would never return to his beloved England after his exile. 

Going through the timeline of Tyndale’s remarkable life and work, John Piper shows that Tyndale was committed firmly to the gospel of Jesus Christ in all that he did. Amid intellectual battles with fierce critics, he wrote his response to Sir Thomas More, who had heavily criticized Tyndale’s translation work. Tyndale masterfully moves through his simple yet profound explanations of his motivations for translation decisions. Near the end, there is an essay on the enduring legacy of William Tyndale and what his life should mean not only for English-speaking Christians but also for the entirety of Christianity.





Introducing Tyndale

by William Tyndale, John Piper, Robert J. Sheehan

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Introducing Tyndale by William Tyndale, John Poper, Robert J. Sheehan

AuthorWilliam Tyndale; John Piper; Robert J. Sheehan
PublisherThe Banner of Truth Trust
Date2017
Pages103


Overview:

Martyr, translator, and banished theologian William Tyndale would suffer for the cause of liberty and pure Christianity so that every man, woman, and child in England could know and understand the Word of God unadulterated by the interpretations of priests and bishops. He would never have a family, and he would never return to his beloved England after his exile. 

Going through the timeline of Tyndale’s remarkable life and work, John Piper shows that Tyndale was committed firmly to the gospel of Jesus Christ in all that he did. Amid intellectual battles with fierce critics, he wrote his response to Sir Thomas More, who had heavily criticized Tyndale’s translation work. Tyndale masterfully moves through his simple yet profound explanations of his motivations for translation decisions. Near the end, there is an essay on the enduring legacy of William Tyndale and what his life should mean not only for English-speaking Christians but also for the entirety of Christianity.