Just Mercy

by Bryan Stevenson     |     Book Summary


Author: Bryan Stevenson
Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
Date: August 18, 2015
Pages: 316

Book Summary of Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson


“The true measure of our character is how we treat the poor, the disfavored, the accused, the incarcerated, and the condemned.” (p. 18)

Thus, Bryan Stevenson sets out to tell the story of Walter McMillian, a black man from rural Alabama who was accused of killing a white woman in 1986. Stevenson knows the story quite well since he was Walter’s lawyer, but he only became his lawyer after McMillian was already on death row.

This work is about far more than McMillian’s case as Stevenson recounts the story of his founding the Equal Justice Initiative and works through many other cases he has handled as a lawyer. The purpose Stevenson has in retelling these stories is to bring the reader “closer to mass incarceration and extreme punishment in America…[and to understand] how easily we condemn people in this country and the injustice we create when we allow fear, anger, and distance to shape the way we treat the most vulnerable among us” (p. 14). 

After all, as one ancient writer put it, mercy triumphs over judgment (Jam. 2:13). 





Just Mercy

by Bryan Stevenson

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

AuthorBryan Stevenson
PublisherSpiegel & Grau
DateAugust 18, 2015
Pages316


Overview:

“The true measure of our character is how we treat the poor, the disfavored, the accused, the incarcerated, and the condemned.” (p. 18)

Thus, Bryan Stevenson sets out to tell the story of Walter McMillian, a black man from rural Alabama who was accused of killing a white woman in 1986. Stevenson knows the story quite well since he was Walter’s lawyer, but he only became his lawyer after McMillian was already on death row.

This work is about far more than McMillian’s case as Stevenson recounts the story of his founding the Equal Justice Initiative and works through many other cases he has handled as a lawyer. The purpose Stevenson has in retelling these stories is to bring the reader “closer to mass incarceration and extreme punishment in America…[and to understand] how easily we condemn people in this country and the injustice we create when we allow fear, anger, and distance to shape the way we treat the most vulnerable among us” (p. 14). 

After all, as one ancient writer put it, mercy triumphs over judgment (Jam. 2:13).