Live Not by Lies

by Rod Dreher     |     Book Summary


Author: Rod Dreher
Publisher: Sentinel
Date: 2020
Pages: 240

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


“In 1989, the Berlin Wall fell, and with it Soviet totalitarianism.” (p. ix) At this pivotal moment in history, many in the West naively assumed that the world was done with totalitarianism and Soviet-styled communism. However, in recent years, many who lived under the Iron Curtain are seeing troubling developments in the West. 

These developments can be thought of as a “progressive—and profoundly anti-Christian militancy” (p. xiii). This militancy manifests itself in cultural and political power-struggles, but most basically this is a power-struggle in the spiritual realm. “This spiritual power takes material form in government and private institutions, in corporations, in academia and media, and in the changing practices of everyday American life. It is empowered by unprecedented technological capabilities to surveil private life. There is virtually nowhere left to hide.” (p. xiii)

Unlike the older, Soviet-styled totalitarianism, often described as “hard totalitarianism” (p. xiii), this new power block can be termed “soft totalitarianism” (p. xiii.) Rather than having hard totalitarianism forced upon us, we are actually inviting soft totalitarianism into our lives. What the world needs is Christian people who are willing to live according to their convictions, which means not living by the lies of the world.





Live Not by Lies

by Rod Dreher

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author Rod Dreher
Publisher Sentinel
Date 2020
Pages 240


Overview:

“In 1989, the Berlin Wall fell, and with it Soviet totalitarianism.” (p. ix) At this pivotal moment in history, many in the West naively assumed that the world was done with totalitarianism and Soviet-styled communism. However, in recent years, many who lived under the Iron Curtain are seeing troubling developments in the West. 

These developments can be thought of as a “progressive—and profoundly anti-Christian militancy” (p. xiii). This militancy manifests itself in cultural and political power-struggles, but most basically this is a power-struggle in the spiritual realm. “This spiritual power takes material form in government and private institutions, in corporations, in academia and media, and in the changing practices of everyday American life. It is empowered by unprecedented technological capabilities to surveil private life. There is virtually nowhere left to hide.” (p. xiii)

Unlike the older, Soviet-styled totalitarianism, often described as “hard totalitarianism” (p. xiii), this new power block can be termed “soft totalitarianism” (p. xiii.) Rather than having hard totalitarianism forced upon us, we are actually inviting soft totalitarianism into our lives. What the world needs is Christian people who are willing to live according to their convictions, which means not living by the lies of the world.