On Being a Servant of God

by Warren W. Wiersbe     |     Book Summary


Author: Warren W. Wiersbe
Publisher: Baker Books
Date: 2015
Pages: 208

Book Summary of On Being a Servant of God by Warren W. Wiersbe


It’s easy to lose sight of the core reason and purpose of ministry. Needs surround us and can overwhelm us to the point that the urgent seems to crowd out the important. In those moments — indeed, in every moment — we need to be reminded of what we’re doing and why.

The wonder of ministry is that God uses weak, sinful, limited people to accomplish His amazing purposes both in their own lives and in the lives of others. The amazing goal of all this is that He receives the glory. 

Ministers, then, need to be those who receive from God, are able to see the gospel-needs around them, and move to meet those needs using all of His resources as He wonderfully works in and through them.

Here are 30 ‘chats’ with a godly and wise minister, in which we will be reminded that “ministry takes place when divine resources meet human needs through loving channels to the glory of God” (p. 15).





On Being a Servant of God

by Warren W. Wiersbe

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of On Being a Servant of God by Warren W. Wiersbe

AuthorWarren Wiersbe
PublisherBaker Books
Date2015
Pages208


Overview:

It’s easy to lose sight of the core reason and purpose of ministry. Needs surround us and can overwhelm us to the point that the urgent seems to crowd out the important. In those moments — indeed, in every moment — we need to be reminded of what we’re doing and why.

The wonder of ministry is that God uses weak, sinful, limited people to accomplish His amazing purposes both in their own lives and in the lives of others. The amazing goal of all this is that He receives the glory. 

Ministers, then, need to be those who receive from God, are able to see the gospel-needs around them, and move to meet those needs using all of His resources as He wonderfully works in and through them.

Here are 30 ‘chats’ with a godly and wise minister, in which we will be reminded that “ministry takes place when divine resources meet human needs through loving channels to the glory of God” (p. 15).