Preaching in an Age of Distraction

by J. Ellsworth Kalas     |     Book Summary


Author: J. Ellsworth Kalas
Publisher: IVP Books
Date: 2014
Pages: 165

Book Summary of Preaching in an Age of Distraction by J. Ellsworth Kalas


“Distractions aren’t unique to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.” (p. 11)

Preachers have always had to overcome the challenge of distractions. There have always been noisy babies and sleepy adults in church. There have always been unexpected illnesses in church. There have always been interruptions to sermon preparation and personal study. 

Nevertheless, preachers today face an unprecedented avalanche of distractions. Technology allows us to carry the greatest distractions in the palm of our hand even as we sit in the pew. Consumerism gives us unlimited options from which to choose, and there’s always something new and improved. Entertainment takes the form of sport, cinema, television, and social media. 

These distractions present serious challenges to gospel communication. However, “it is not acceptable to complain about the times or bemoan the problems. If distraction is a fact of our era, then we are called as faith-communicators to contend with it. If, further, distraction is a dominant factor in our times, we should waste no time in knowing how to use it rather than allowing it to make us irrelevant” (p. 19).





Preaching in an Age of Distraction

by J. Ellsworth Kalas

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Preaching in an Age of Distraction by J. Ellsworth Kalas

AuthorJ. Ellsworth Kalas
PublisherIVP Books
Date2014
Pages165


Overview:

“Distractions aren’t unique to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.” (p. 11)

Preachers have always had to overcome the challenge of distractions. There have always been noisy babies and sleepy adults in church. There have always been unexpected illnesses in church. There have always been interruptions to sermon preparation and personal study. 

Nevertheless, preachers today face an unprecedented avalanche of distractions. Technology allows us to carry the greatest distractions in the palm of our hand even as we sit in the pew. Consumerism gives us unlimited options from which to choose, and there’s always something new and improved. Entertainment takes the form of sport, cinema, television, and social media. 

These distractions present serious challenges to gospel communication. However, “it is not acceptable to complain about the times or bemoan the problems. If distraction is a fact of our era, then we are called as faith-communicators to contend with it. If, further, distraction is a dominant factor in our times, we should waste no time in knowing how to use it rather than allowing it to make us irrelevant” (p. 19).