Preaching That Moves People

by Yancey Arrington     |     Book Summary


Author: Yancey Arrington
Publisher: Clear Creek Resources
Date: 2018
Pages: 165

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


“In my years of preaching and training other preachers, I have frequently found that the common root of our mis-hit messages is sermon delivery.” (p. 19) Many preachers are skilled at exegesis and writing, but too few give enough attention to the art of sermon delivery. Many preachers spend hours studying the text and writing their message, but too few give enough time to thinking about how they will deliver their sermon. 

This lack of attention toward the actual act of preaching and delivery is odd, especially considering the fact that “the sermon is an oral medium” (p. 19). Can you imagine opera singers who refuse to warm up before a performance? Can you imagine concert pianists who refuse to practice scales? Can you imagine a professional baseball player who refuses to work in the batting cage? Each of these examples is hard to imagine, and so is the preacher who spends all his time writing without practicing his delivery. 

The bottom line with preaching is this: “It matters how you say what you say” (p. 26, emphases in original).  Too many sermons today are “technically sound” without also being “emotionally sound” (p. 26). This book is intended to make preachers think about how they preach instead of just what they preach.





Preaching That Moves People

by Yancey Arrington

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author Yancey Arrington
Publisher Clear Creek Resources
Date 2018
Pages 165


Overview:

“In my years of preaching and training other preachers, I have frequently found that the common root of our mis-hit messages is sermon delivery.” (p. 19) Many preachers are skilled at exegesis and writing, but too few give enough attention to the art of sermon delivery. Many preachers spend hours studying the text and writing their message, but too few give enough time to thinking about how they will deliver their sermon. 

This lack of attention toward the actual act of preaching and delivery is odd, especially considering the fact that “the sermon is an oral medium” (p. 19). Can you imagine opera singers who refuse to warm up before a performance? Can you imagine concert pianists who refuse to practice scales? Can you imagine a professional baseball player who refuses to work in the batting cage? Each of these examples is hard to imagine, and so is the preacher who spends all his time writing without practicing his delivery. 

The bottom line with preaching is this: “It matters how you say what you say” (p. 26, emphases in original).  Too many sermons today are “technically sound” without also being “emotionally sound” (p. 26). This book is intended to make preachers think about how they preach instead of just what they preach.