Rethinking the Dates of the New Testament

by Jonathan Bernier     |     Book Summary


Author: Jonathan Bernier
Publisher: Baker Academic
Date: 2022
Pages: 318

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


“This study asks when each of the twenty-seven books that are now collected in the corpus known as the New Testament were written… It will conclude that, with the notable exception of the undisputed Pauline Epistles, the majority of the texts that were eventually incorporated into the New Testament corpus were likely written twenty to thirty years earlier than is typically supposed by contemporary biblical scholars.” (p. 1)

This study both relies on and builds on the work of John A.T. Robinson in Redating the New Testament. In that book, Robinson argued that since the New Testament authors never specifically refer to the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70, we should conclude that the 27 books that constitute the New Testament all were written before this cataclysmic event. 

Going beyond the work of Robinson, this study approaches the question of chronology with a threefold procedure, considering issues of synchronization, contextualization, and authorial biography. Additionally, this study adjudicates various theories on the basis of freedom from fallacy, evidentiary scope, and parsimony. With this method of study, “this study concludes that a lower chronology is most fully warranted” (p. 277).





Rethinking the Dates of the New Testament

by Jonathan Bernier

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author Jonathan Bernier
Publisher Baker Academic
Date 2022
Pages 318


Overview:

“This study asks when each of the twenty-seven books that are now collected in the corpus known as the New Testament were written… It will conclude that, with the notable exception of the undisputed Pauline Epistles, the majority of the texts that were eventually incorporated into the New Testament corpus were likely written twenty to thirty years earlier than is typically supposed by contemporary biblical scholars.” (p. 1)

This study both relies on and builds on the work of John A.T. Robinson in Redating the New Testament. In that book, Robinson argued that since the New Testament authors never specifically refer to the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70, we should conclude that the 27 books that constitute the New Testament all were written before this cataclysmic event. 

Going beyond the work of Robinson, this study approaches the question of chronology with a threefold procedure, considering issues of synchronization, contextualization, and authorial biography. Additionally, this study adjudicates various theories on the basis of freedom from fallacy, evidentiary scope, and parsimony. With this method of study, “this study concludes that a lower chronology is most fully warranted” (p. 277).