Talking Back to Purity Culture

by Rachel Joy Welcher     |     Book Summary


Author: Rachel Joy Welcher
Publisher: IVP
Date: November 10, 2020
Pages: 216

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


Evangelical purity culture taught a generation in the 90s and 2000s to measure sexual purity by virginity at marriage and to demonstrate it by wearing rings and signing pledges in anticipation of the reward of fantastic marital sex and a family. Now, that generation has grown up. Many struggle with the messages they were taught then. There was wisdom in the message, but much about sex also was distorted.

Sex was idolized, virginity turned into a badge of righteousness, and purity diminished from being the gift of Christ to something attainable by the right sexual behavior. Meanwhile, pressure was placed on men, who were told that they couldn’t control their sexual desires, while women received the message that they were responsible for male sexual behavior, or at least responsible in part.

How should we respond when we find ourselves falling short of biblical truth? Some have attempted to jettison anything remotely recognizable as a biblical sexual ethic. Rather than overcorrecting though, we need to ask careful questions and look for biblical and godly answers.

What we find when we do is far better news than a prosperity-gospel-like promise of marital sex. Instead, we find the gracious giver of indelible purity and freedom for all in Him.





Talking Back to Purity Culture

by Rachel Joy Welcher

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author Rachel Joy Welcher
Publisher IVP
Date November 10, 2020
Pages 216


Overview:

Evangelical purity culture taught a generation in the 90s and 2000s to measure sexual purity by virginity at marriage and to demonstrate it by wearing rings and signing pledges in anticipation of the reward of fantastic marital sex and a family. Now, that generation has grown up. Many struggle with the messages they were taught then. There was wisdom in the message, but much about sex also was distorted.

Sex was idolized, virginity turned into a badge of righteousness, and purity diminished from being the gift of Christ to something attainable by the right sexual behavior. Meanwhile, pressure was placed on men, who were told that they couldn’t control their sexual desires, while women received the message that they were responsible for male sexual behavior, or at least responsible in part.

How should we respond when we find ourselves falling short of biblical truth? Some have attempted to jettison anything remotely recognizable as a biblical sexual ethic. Rather than overcorrecting though, we need to ask careful questions and look for biblical and godly answers.

What we find when we do is far better news than a prosperity-gospel-like promise of marital sex. Instead, we find the gracious giver of indelible purity and freedom for all in Him.