Teaching the World

by John Cartwright, Gabriel Etzel, Christopher Jackson, and Timothy Paul Jones     |     Book Summary


Author: John Cartwright, Gabriel Etzel, Christopher Jackson, and Timothy Paul Jones
Publisher: B&H Academic
Date: 2017
Pages: 188

Book Summary of Teaching the World by John Cartwright, Gabriel Etzel, Christopher Jackson, and Timothy Paul Jones


The world is becoming increasingly digital. The largest secular educational institutions are moving online. But what about Christian institutions? Can theological education really happen online?

Ministry preparation can neither be shaped by pragmatism nor finances. Rather, theological education must primarily be informed and conformed to the Word of God with the theological implications drawn from Scripture.  

Online theological education is part of the present, and students can be prepared for ministry through the online medium. This is not merely pragmatic. Scripture models distance education done well, and it gives us principles for how to do this work well. It will require some shifts in thinking, but it will still conform to the goals and foundations of traditional, residential theological education. 

In theological education, “the importance of a relationship with God and with others within the context of spiritual formation is essential” (p. 75). This context can be developed in an online learning environment, though it takes hard work and intentionality of course design.

Is online theological education the way of the future? It’s certainly a part of the future, whether we like it or not. Now the emphasis should be on doing it well.





Teaching the World

by John Cartwright, Gabriel Etzel, Christopher Jackson, and Timothy Paul Jones

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Teaching the World by John Cartwright, Gabriel Etzel, Christopher Jackson, and Timothy Paul Jones

AuthorJohn Cartwright, Gabriel Etzel, Christopher Jackson, and Timothy Paul Jones
PublisherB&H Academic
Date2017
Pages188


Overview:

The world is becoming increasingly digital. The largest secular educational institutions are moving online. But what about Christian institutions? Can theological education really happen online?

Ministry preparation can neither be shaped by pragmatism nor finances. Rather, theological education must primarily be informed and conformed to the Word of God with the theological implications drawn from Scripture.  

Online theological education is part of the present, and students can be prepared for ministry through the online medium. This is not merely pragmatic. Scripture models distance education done well, and it gives us principles for how to do this work well. It will require some shifts in thinking, but it will still conform to the goals and foundations of traditional, residential theological education. 

In theological education, “the importance of a relationship with God and with others within the context of spiritual formation is essential” (p. 75). This context can be developed in an online learning environment, though it takes hard work and intentionality of course design.

Is online theological education the way of the future? It’s certainly a part of the future, whether we like it or not. Now the emphasis should be on doing it well.




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