The Bondage of the Will

by Martin Luther     |     Book Summary


Author:Martin Luther
Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
Date: 1525 (briefed edition, 2004)
Pages: 322

Book Summary of The Bondage of the Will by Martin Luther


How powerful is the will of man compared to the will of God? Is man’s will free, or is it in bondage? Does the issue even matter, or is this just a theological squabble not affecting a normal Christian’s day-to-day life? 

The Bondage of the Will portrays Martin Luther’s discussion of how much power the will of man has compared to the will of God. 

Luther wrote this book as a rebuttal to Erasmus, who challenged Luther with his own book called The Freedom of the Will. Erasmus was a well-known Bible scholar whose strengths were languages and literature. Luther had the advantage in theology and boldness, but Erasmus had the edge in eloquence. 

Luther provides a biblical case for man’s inability to save himself. The Bondage of the Will is filled with Scripture refuting Erasmus along with sarcastic quotes from Luther that keep it interesting.





The Bondage of the Will

by Martin Luther

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Bondage of the Will by Martin Luther

AuthorMartin Luther
PublisherFleming H. Revell
Date1525 (briefed edition, 2004)
Pages322


Overview:

How powerful is the will of man compared to the will of God? Is man’s will free, or is it in bondage? Does the issue even matter, or is this just a theological squabble not affecting a normal Christian’s day-to-day life? 

The Bondage of the Will portrays Martin Luther’s discussion of how much power the will of man has compared to the will of God. 

Luther wrote this book as a rebuttal to Erasmus, who challenged Luther with his own book called The Freedom of the Will. Erasmus was a well-known Bible scholar whose strengths were languages and literature. Luther had the advantage in theology and boldness, but Erasmus had the edge in eloquence. 

Luther provides a biblical case for man’s inability to save himself. The Bondage of the Will is filled with Scripture refuting Erasmus along with sarcastic quotes from Luther that keep it interesting.