The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read

by Christopher Ash     |     Book Summary


Author: Christopher Ash
Publisher: The Good Book Company
Date: 2019
Pages: 126

Book Summary of The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read by Christopher Ash


The role of pastor includes a number of responsibilities. There are sermons to preach, studies to lead, people to counsel, and visits to make. In all of these activities, the pastor is called to care for people. After all, he is a “pastor-shepherd.”

Obviously, pastors are called to care for their congregation. But who cares for the pastor? Who is called to care for him? The biblical answer is clear: the church itself is called to care for the pastor. 

However, this dynamic puts many pastors in an awkward situation. What does a pastor do or say when his church is not caring for him?

“It is not easy for your own pastor to give you a message that amounts to this: ‘Come on, guys, you need to raise your game!’ If they are not embarrassed, they probably should be!” (p. 10)

Church members need to understand their responsibility to care for their pastor, and that message probably needs to be delivered by someone other than the pastor himself. 

When a pastor cares for his people and those people in turn care for their pastor, “both pastors and people grow in a glad Christ-likeness” (p. 12).





The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read

by Christopher Ash

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Book Your Pastor Wishes You Would Read by Christopher Ash

AuthorChristopher Ash
PublisherThe Good Book Company
Date2019
Pages126


Overview:

The role of pastor includes a number of responsibilities. There are sermons to preach, studies to lead, people to counsel, and visits to make. In all of these activities, the pastor is called to care for people. After all, he is a “pastor-shepherd.”

Obviously, pastors are called to care for their congregation. But who cares for the pastor? Who is called to care for him? The biblical answer is clear: the church itself is called to care for the pastor. 

However, this dynamic puts many pastors in an awkward situation. What does a pastor do or say when his church is not caring for him?

“It is not easy for your own pastor to give you a message that amounts to this: ‘Come on, guys, you need to raise your game!’ If they are not embarrassed, they probably should be!” (p. 10)

Church members need to understand their responsibility to care for their pastor, and that message probably needs to be delivered by someone other than the pastor himself. 

When a pastor cares for his people and those people in turn care for their pastor, “both pastors and people grow in a glad Christ-likeness” (p. 12).