The Distinctiveness of Baptist Covenant Theology

by Pascal Denault     |     Book Summary


Author: Pascal Denault
Publisher: Solid Ground Christian Books
Date: January 8, 2013
Pages: 156

Book Summary of The Distinctiveness of Baptist Covenant Theology by Pascal Denault


Though the most obvious difference between Baptists (credobaptists) and Presbyterians (paedobaptists) may seem to be who and how they baptize, the root of this difference goes deeper. “Covenant theology is [the fundamental] distinctive between Baptists and paedobaptists and…all the divergences that exist between them, both theological and practical, including baptism, stem from their different ways of understanding the biblical covenants.” (p. 5) 

Thus, understanding the baptism debate means more than simply saying there are no New Testament examples of infant baptism. The deeper issue at stake is Who really makes up the people of God? 

To get to the answer to this question, one has to understand the way God relates to His people in both the Old and New Testaments and understand the way the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace function in God’s economy of salvation. 

In contrast to the Presbyterians, the 17th century Baptists saw the New Covenant as truly new because in it Christ had accomplished the Covenant of Works. The New Covenant was an unbreakable covenant only entered into by those born again, all based on the merits of Christ.





The Distinctiveness of Baptist Covenant Theology

by Pascal Denault

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Distinctiveness of Baptist Covenant Theology by Pascal Denault

AuthorPascal Denault
PublisherSolid Ground Christian Books
DateJanuary 8, 2013
Pages156


Overview:

Though the most obvious difference between Baptists (credobaptists) and Presbyterians (paedobaptists) may seem to be who and how they baptize, the root of this difference goes deeper. “Covenant theology is [the fundamental] distinctive between Baptists and paedobaptists and…all the divergences that exist between them, both theological and practical, including baptism, stem from their different ways of understanding the biblical covenants.” (p. 5) 

Thus, understanding the baptism debate means more than simply saying there are no New Testament examples of infant baptism. The deeper issue at stake is Who really makes up the people of God? 

To get to the answer to this question, one has to understand the way God relates to His people in both the Old and New Testaments and understand the way the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace function in God’s economy of salvation. 

In contrast to the Presbyterians, the 17th century Baptists saw the New Covenant as truly new because in it Christ had accomplished the Covenant of Works. The New Covenant was an unbreakable covenant only entered into by those born again, all based on the merits of Christ.