The End of Our Exploring

by Matthew Lee Anderson     |     Book Summary


Author: Matthew Lee Anderson
Publisher: Moody Publishers
Date: 2013
Pages: 214

Book Summary of The End of Our Exploring by Matthew Lee Anderson


“This book explores what it means to ask a question and treats questioning as a kind of exploration. It is a book that poses a series of questions and—while acknowledging every ounce of the irony—proposes what might be considered answers.” (p. 11)

Specifically, The End of Our Exploring sets out to “question our questions” (p. 12). Socrates believed that the unexamined life is not worth living, and this book insists that “the unexamined question is not worth asking” (p. 12, emphasis in original):

  • We ought to be questioning people. 
  • We ought to be open to learning about the world. 
  • We ought to be driven by the desire to understand. 

Our questions both reveal and shape our desires. In a real sense, our questions reveal “negative spaces” (p. 23) in our thinking. These negative spaces are unknowns that launch us into the act of questioning. “We set about exploring because we feel, however, opaquely, that what we discover will be good” (p. 23, emphasis in original). Instinctively, we know that truth is better than ignorance. 

If the unknowns of life are going to drive us to ask questions, we might as well “learn to ask better questions” (p. 26).





The End of Our Exploring

by Matthew Lee Anderson

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The End of Our Exploring by Matthew Lee Anderson

AuthorMatthew Lee Anderson
PublisherMoody Publishers
Date2013
Pages214


Overview:

“This book explores what it means to ask a question and treats questioning as a kind of exploration. It is a book that poses a series of questions and—while acknowledging every ounce of the irony—proposes what might be considered answers.” (p. 11)

Specifically, The End of Our Exploring sets out to “question our questions” (p. 12). Socrates believed that the unexamined life is not worth living, and this book insists that “the unexamined question is not worth asking” (p. 12, emphasis in original):

  • We ought to be questioning people. 
  • We ought to be open to learning about the world. 
  • We ought to be driven by the desire to understand. 

Our questions both reveal and shape our desires. In a real sense, our questions reveal “negative spaces” (p. 23) in our thinking. These negative spaces are unknowns that launch us into the act of questioning. “We set about exploring because we feel, however, opaquely, that what we discover will be good” (p. 23, emphasis in original). Instinctively, we know that truth is better than ignorance. 

If the unknowns of life are going to drive us to ask questions, we might as well “learn to ask better questions” (p. 26).