The Everlasting Man

by G.K. Chesterton     |     Book Summary


Author:  G.K. Chesterton
Publisher: Martino Fine Books
Date: 1925
Pages: 236

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


As modern persons, it is very easy to take much of our received wisdom for granted. We go about our lives without fully examining the nature of man or the objectives and effects of the physical sciences, the social sciences, and our religions.

When we do examine these things from a fresh perspective, some ideas start to appear very strange. In particular, two claims appear unusual: 

  1. Man is an animal like any other animal. 
  2. Christ is a man just like any other man. 

When you really dig into the nature of humanity, you see that this wandering, wondering, creative, rational race, when likened to animals, only demonstrates how dissimilar we really are. Likewise, when we examine Christ and His nature, we see that He is, quite unequivocally, unlike any other man who ever lived, and the religious history of the church He founded is “the strangest story in the world” (p. 262).





The Everlasting Man

by G.K. Chesterton

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author G.K. Chesterton
Publisher Martino Fine Books
Date 1925
Pages 236


Overview:

As modern persons, it is very easy to take much of our received wisdom for granted. We go about our lives without fully examining the nature of man or the objectives and effects of the physical sciences, the social sciences, and our religions.

When we do examine these things from a fresh perspective, some ideas start to appear very strange. In particular, two claims appear unusual: 

  1. Man is an animal like any other animal. 
  2. Christ is a man just like any other man. 

When you really dig into the nature of humanity, you see that this wandering, wondering, creative, rational race, when likened to animals, only demonstrates how dissimilar we really are. Likewise, when we examine Christ and His nature, we see that He is, quite unequivocally, unlike any other man who ever lived, and the religious history of the church He founded is “the strangest story in the world” (p. 262).