The Forgotten Spurgeon

by Iain Murray     |     Book Summary


Author: Iain H. Murray
Publisher: The Banner of Truth Trust
Date: 1966
Pages: 284

Book Summary of The Forgotten Spurgeon by Iain Murray


During the 20th century, the London preacher known as Charles Spurgeon has been seen as a champion for evangelicalism. Sadly, the Spurgeon that has been “forgotten” is the one with precise doctrine and a veteran to controversial engagement. Spurgeon’s narrow orthodoxy largely was shaped by the debates that plagued Victorian England. The first debate, when he first ascended the pulpit in the 1850’s, was over a diluted gospel. The second debate was over “Baptismal Regeneration” in 1864, and the third debate was the famous “Down-Grade controversy” that plagued the end of his life. 

“These three controversies have been very superficially treated (if treated at all) on the grounds that they do not represent the ‘real’ Spurgeon: at New Park Street he was young and his views immature, or, in the Down-Grade he was ill and lapsing in his judgment!” (p. 177)





The Forgotten Spurgeon

by Iain Murray

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Forgotten Spurgeon by Iain Murray

AuthorIain H. Murray
PublisherThe Banner of Truth Trust
Date1966
Pages284


Overview:

During the 20th century, the London preacher known as Charles Spurgeon has been seen as a champion for evangelicalism. Sadly, the Spurgeon that has been “forgotten” is the one with precise doctrine and a veteran to controversial engagement. Spurgeon’s narrow orthodoxy largely was shaped by the debates that plagued Victorian England. The first debate, when he first ascended the pulpit in the 1850’s, was over a diluted gospel. The second debate was over “Baptismal Regeneration” in 1864, and the third debate was the famous “Down-Grade controversy” that plagued the end of his life. 

“These three controversies have been very superficially treated (if treated at all) on the grounds that they do not represent the ‘real’ Spurgeon: at New Park Street he was young and his views immature, or, in the Down-Grade he was ill and lapsing in his judgment!” (p. 177)