The Future of Our Faith

by Ronald J. Sider and Ben Lowe     |     Book Summary


Author: Ronald J. Sider and Ben Lowe
Publisher: Brazos Press
Date: 2016
Pages: 230

Book Summary of The Future of Our Faith by Ronald J. Sider and Ben Lowe


“It doesn’t take being part of the Christian faith for very long before tensions between older and younger generations become apparent. We don’t see eye to eye on many things.” (p. 1)

In some sense, these tensions are both inevitable and not unique to church life. Older generations typically want to preserve the “traditions and institutions” (p. 1) that have been part of their lives. Younger generations typically want to initiate change and reform the status quo. These desires result in tension between generations, and the church is not immune to these tensions. 

In church life, older generations are often horrified by the changes promoted by younger Christians, and younger generations are often frustrated by the stubbornness of older Christians. Too often, these frustrations result in younger Christians leaving established churches and older Christians complaining about those who leave. 

Maybe there’s a better solution than leaving and complaining. Maybe older Christians and younger Christians need to sit down together and talk to each other. 

“This book is about discussing key issues facing the church today.” (p. 3) Ignoring these issues is not an option if the church is going to move forward with a unified witness and unified mission.





The Future of Our Faith

by Ronald J. Sider and Ben Lowe

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Future of Our Faith by Ronald J. Sider and Ben Lowe

AuthorRonald J. Sider and Ben Lowe
PublisherBrazos Press
Date2016
Pages230


Overview:

“It doesn’t take being part of the Christian faith for very long before tensions between older and younger generations become apparent. We don’t see eye to eye on many things.” (p. 1)

In some sense, these tensions are both inevitable and not unique to church life. Older generations typically want to preserve the “traditions and institutions” (p. 1) that have been part of their lives. Younger generations typically want to initiate change and reform the status quo. These desires result in tension between generations, and the church is not immune to these tensions. 

In church life, older generations are often horrified by the changes promoted by younger Christians, and younger generations are often frustrated by the stubbornness of older Christians. Too often, these frustrations result in younger Christians leaving established churches and older Christians complaining about those who leave. 

Maybe there’s a better solution than leaving and complaining. Maybe older Christians and younger Christians need to sit down together and talk to each other. 

“This book is about discussing key issues facing the church today.” (p. 3) Ignoring these issues is not an option if the church is going to move forward with a unified witness and unified mission.