The Longview

by Roger Parrott     |     Book Summary


Author: Roger Parrott
Publisher: David C. Cook
Date: 2009
Pages: 255

Book Summary of The Longview by Roger Parott


“We live in a quick-fix, immediate-impact, short-view world. But we serve a longview God.” (p. 9)

Christian leaders must wrestle with the pressure of manufacturing immediate results and the necessity of making decisions that consider the longview. This is true for Christians who find themselves leading in a ministry setting as well as those who find themselves leading in the marketplace. It doesn’t matter where a person’s sphere of leadership is rooted, “Today’s rising leaders have been reared, tutored, and equipped to operate in a world that prizes immediate results” (p. 11). Unfortunately, the decisions that lead to immediate results often have negative, long-term consequences. 

In the 1980s, ignoring the longview resulted in a burgeoning junk bond market. In the 1990s, ignoring the longview resulted in the dot-com bubble and rising credit card debt. In the 2000s, ignoring the longview resulted in a real-estate bubble.

The mindset of prioritizing immediate results at the expense of the longview has also infiltrated churches and ministries. “Even the church has swallowed whole the cultural lie that immediate results are more important than lasting transformation.” (p. 12)

Leaders must learn to prioritize the longview in their planning, strategies, decisions, planning, and relationships.





The Longview

by Roger Parrott

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Longview by Roger Parott

AuthorRoger Parrott
PublisherDavid C. Cook
Date2009
Pages255


Overview:

“We live in a quick-fix, immediate-impact, short-view world. But we serve a longview God.” (p. 9)

Christian leaders must wrestle with the pressure of manufacturing immediate results and the necessity of making decisions that consider the longview. This is true for Christians who find themselves leading in a ministry setting as well as those who find themselves leading in the marketplace. It doesn’t matter where a person’s sphere of leadership is rooted, “Today’s rising leaders have been reared, tutored, and equipped to operate in a world that prizes immediate results” (p. 11). Unfortunately, the decisions that lead to immediate results often have negative, long-term consequences. 

In the 1980s, ignoring the longview resulted in a burgeoning junk bond market. In the 1990s, ignoring the longview resulted in the dot-com bubble and rising credit card debt. In the 2000s, ignoring the longview resulted in a real-estate bubble.

The mindset of prioritizing immediate results at the expense of the longview has also infiltrated churches and ministries. “Even the church has swallowed whole the cultural lie that immediate results are more important than lasting transformation.” (p. 12)

Leaders must learn to prioritize the longview in their planning, strategies, decisions, planning, and relationships.




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