The Pietist Option

by Christopher Gehrz and Mark Pattie     |     Book Summary


Author: Christopher Gehrz and Mark Pattie
Publisher: IVP Academic
Date: 2017
Pages: 148

Book Summary of The Pietist Option by Christopher Gehrz and Mark Pattie III


“Pietism calls people back to Jesus when and where it’s most needed.” (p. 4) It’s true that Pietists have not produced lasting denominations, statements of faith, or religious institutions. In some ways, it is difficult to locate the lasting legacy of Pietism in the twenty-first century. Nevertheless, “Pietism has disappeared not because it failed, but because it succeeded” (p. 4, emphasis in original).

Pietism can be thought of as a leavening movement. Rather than thinking of Pietism as a denomination or institution, think of Pietism as “a timeless spirit, or ethos” (p. 4, emphases in original). This ethos can be summarized in several shared instincts:

  1. “We know God more through prepositions than propositions.” (p. 6)
  2. “We’re better together than apart.” (p. 6)
  3. “Christianity is both less and more than we think.” (p. 7)
  4. “We always have hope for better times.” (p. 8)

These instincts can be traced back to Philipp Spener and his book Pia Desideria. Published in 1675, Pia Desideria “launched the German Pietist movement” (p. 10). The wisdom and suggestions Spener offered in 1675 are remarkably applicable to church life nowadays. Those who listen to Spener’s proposals will find themselves being called back to Jesus.





The Pietist Option

by Christopher Gehrz and Mark Pattie

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Pietist Option by Christopher Gehrz and Mark Pattie III

AuthorChristopher Gehrz and Mark Pattie III
PublisherIVP Academic
Date2017
Pages148


Overview:

“Pietism calls people back to Jesus when and where it’s most needed.” (p. 4) It’s true that Pietists have not produced lasting denominations, statements of faith, or religious institutions. In some ways, it is difficult to locate the lasting legacy of Pietism in the twenty-first century. Nevertheless, “Pietism has disappeared not because it failed, but because it succeeded” (p. 4, emphasis in original).

Pietism can be thought of as a leavening movement. Rather than thinking of Pietism as a denomination or institution, think of Pietism as “a timeless spirit, or ethos” (p. 4, emphases in original). This ethos can be summarized in several shared instincts:

  1. “We know God more through prepositions than propositions.” (p. 6)
  2. “We’re better together than apart.” (p. 6)
  3. “Christianity is both less and more than we think.” (p. 7)
  4. “We always have hope for better times.” (p. 8)

These instincts can be traced back to Philipp Spener and his book Pia Desideria. Published in 1675, Pia Desideria “launched the German Pietist movement” (p. 10). The wisdom and suggestions Spener offered in 1675 are remarkably applicable to church life nowadays. Those who listen to Spener’s proposals will find themselves being called back to Jesus.