The Reason for God

by Timothy Keller     |     Book Summary


Author: Tim Keller
Publisher: Riverhead Books
Date: 2008
Pages: 310

Book Summary of The Reason for God by Timothy Keller


“There is a great gulf today between what is popularly known as liberalism and conservatism.” (p. ix) People on either side of this gulf disagree with each other on a number of important issues. However, the gulf is bigger than mere disagreement. The gulf also includes disdain for the other side. 

This gulf of disagreement and disdain has resulted in fear. Religious people are afraid that secularists are taking over influential institutions. Secularists fear that religious people wield too much political power. Both sides genuinely believe their continued existence is threatened by those on the other side of the cultural gulf. 

“In short, the world is polarizing over religion.” (p. x)

If humanity is going to move beyond the current stalemate, two things must change. 

First, everyone must accept the reality that religious thought and secular thought are both “on the rise” (p. xvi). Second, religious people and secular people must, “look at doubt in a radically new way” (p. xvii). 

What would be involved in a new approach to doubt? For secular people, there must be an admission that “faith” is certainly part of the secular worldview. For religious people, there must be a willingness to wrestle with the questions being asked by the other side.





The Reason for God

by Timothy Keller

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Reason for God by Timothy Keller

AuthorTim Keller
PublisherRiverhead Books
Date2008
Pages310


Overview:

“There is a great gulf today between what is popularly known as liberalism and conservatism.” (p. ix) People on either side of this gulf disagree with each other on a number of important issues. However, the gulf is bigger than mere disagreement. The gulf also includes disdain for the other side. 

This gulf of disagreement and disdain has resulted in fear. Religious people are afraid that secularists are taking over influential institutions. Secularists fear that religious people wield too much political power. Both sides genuinely believe their continued existence is threatened by those on the other side of the cultural gulf. 

“In short, the world is polarizing over religion.” (p. x)

If humanity is going to move beyond the current stalemate, two things must change. 

First, everyone must accept the reality that religious thought and secular thought are both “on the rise” (p. xvi). Second, religious people and secular people must, “look at doubt in a radically new way” (p. xvii). 

What would be involved in a new approach to doubt? For secular people, there must be an admission that “faith” is certainly part of the secular worldview. For religious people, there must be a willingness to wrestle with the questions being asked by the other side.