The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self

by Carl R. Trueman     |     Book Summary


Author: Carl R. Trueman
Publisher: Crossway
Date: 2020
Pages: 425

Book Summary of The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self by Carl R. Trueman


“The origins of this book lie in my curiosity about how and why a particular statement has come to be regarded as coherent and meaningful: ‘I am a woman trapped in a man’s body.’” (p. 19) 

Whatever one thinks about the validity of such a statement, it is worth noting that the vast majority of people who have ever lived on planet Earth never heard such an idea expressed and would not know how to process such a statement. However, two decades into the 21st century, this statement is entirely coherent and meaningful to many people. Furthermore, those who deny the validity of such a claim are immediately labeled “stupid” or “immoral” (p. 19).

The claim of this book is simple: one cannot possibly understand the sexual revolution, homosexual marriage, and transgenderism without first understanding “how society undertands the nature of human selfhood” (p. 20). 

In other words, the sexual revolution is merely a sub-revolution of a broader revolution in the way people think about our identity as humans. If one can make sense of how people define themselves as human beings in the 21st century, one can begin to make sense of how the sexual revolution has changed our thoughts about gender and sexuality.





The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self

by Carl R. Trueman

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self by Carl R. Trueman

AuthorCarl R. Trueman
PublisherCrossway
Date2020
Pages425


Overview:

“The origins of this book lie in my curiosity about how and why a particular statement has come to be regarded as coherent and meaningful: ‘I am a woman trapped in a man’s body.’” (p. 19) 

Whatever one thinks about the validity of such a statement, it is worth noting that the vast majority of people who have ever lived on planet Earth never heard such an idea expressed and would not know how to process such a statement. However, two decades into the 21st century, this statement is entirely coherent and meaningful to many people. Furthermore, those who deny the validity of such a claim are immediately labeled “stupid” or “immoral” (p. 19).

The claim of this book is simple: one cannot possibly understand the sexual revolution, homosexual marriage, and transgenderism without first understanding “how society undertands the nature of human selfhood” (p. 20). 

In other words, the sexual revolution is merely a sub-revolution of a broader revolution in the way people think about our identity as humans. If one can make sense of how people define themselves as human beings in the 21st century, one can begin to make sense of how the sexual revolution has changed our thoughts about gender and sexuality.