The Road Back to You

by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile     |     Book Summary


Author: Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile
Publisher: IVP Books
Date: 2016
Pages: 238

Book Summary of The Road Back to You by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile


At some point in life, many people find themselves on a path of self-discovery. These journeys are frequently made easier by a number of tests, assessments, inventories, and questionnaires. An increasingly popular approach to self-discovery is the Enneagram.

Strangely enough, “no one knows for certain when, where or who first came up with the idea for this map of the human personality. What is clear is that it’s been a work in progress for a long time” (p. 10). 

Throughout the centuries, contributions have come from Christian monks, mystical Muslims, Jewish rabbis, and Catholic priests. Despite a long history and varied contributions, “there is no scientific evidence that proves the Enneagram is a reliable measure of personality” (p. 11). 

If this is true, why would anyone willingly subject him or herself to this personality profile? 

The answer is simple: knowledge of self. The Enneagram is not perfect, nor is it indispensable to Christian spirituality. It is, however, very useful for obtaining an accurate knowledge of self. 

Knowledge of self is more than self-actualization and self-esteem. Knowledge of self allows a person to recognize strengths and weaknesses, as well as areas where they need to grow or change. Additionally, knowledge of self is tied to knowledge of God in that knowing ourselves allows us to know God better.





The Road Back to You

by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of The Road Back to You by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile

AuthorIan Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile
PublisherIVP Books
Date2016
Pages238


Overview:

At some point in life, many people find themselves on a path of self-discovery. These journeys are frequently made easier by a number of tests, assessments, inventories, and questionnaires. An increasingly popular approach to self-discovery is the Enneagram.

Strangely enough, “no one knows for certain when, where or who first came up with the idea for this map of the human personality. What is clear is that it’s been a work in progress for a long time” (p. 10). 

Throughout the centuries, contributions have come from Christian monks, mystical Muslims, Jewish rabbis, and Catholic priests. Despite a long history and varied contributions, “there is no scientific evidence that proves the Enneagram is a reliable measure of personality” (p. 11). 

If this is true, why would anyone willingly subject him or herself to this personality profile? 

The answer is simple: knowledge of self. The Enneagram is not perfect, nor is it indispensable to Christian spirituality. It is, however, very useful for obtaining an accurate knowledge of self. 

Knowledge of self is more than self-actualization and self-esteem. Knowledge of self allows a person to recognize strengths and weaknesses, as well as areas where they need to grow or change. Additionally, knowledge of self is tied to knowledge of God in that knowing ourselves allows us to know God better.