The Tech Wise Family

by Andy Crouch     |     Book Summary


Author: Andy Crouch
Publisher: Baker Books
Date: April 18, 2017
Pages: 217

Book Summary of The Tech Wise Family by Andy Crouch


Do you use your phone too much? Do you spend a lot of time in front of the television or binging on Netflix? Do you catch yourself perusing social media, wondering how you got there? Are you a serious gamer who sees time fly past without realizing it? If so, you’re not alone. Technology, useful as it is, can also wreak havoc on our lives if we fail to use self-control and discretion.

It doesn’t have to be this way. If you want control over the technology you use in your home, it takes commitment, good habits, and nudges to push you in the right direction. Living such a countercultural lifestyle will not be easy, but it will certainly be a blessing to those looking for something more than living in a glazed-over, tech-induced coma.

To do this, we must start making key decisions about “patterns of life” (p. 37). Put simply, “If we want a better life, for ourselves and for our families, we will have to choose it — and the best way to choose it is to nudge and discipline ourselves toward the kind of life we most deeply want” (p. 37).





The Tech Wise Family

by Andy Crouch

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

AuthorAndy Crouch
PublisherBaker Books
DateApril 18, 2017
Pages217


Overview:

Do you use your phone too much? Do you spend a lot of time in front of the television or binging on Netflix? Do you catch yourself perusing social media, wondering how you got there? Are you a serious gamer who sees time fly past without realizing it? If so, you’re not alone. Technology, useful as it is, can also wreak havoc on our lives if we fail to use self-control and discretion.

It doesn’t have to be this way. If you want control over the technology you use in your home, it takes commitment, good habits, and nudges to push you in the right direction. Living such a countercultural lifestyle will not be easy, but it will certainly be a blessing to those looking for something more than living in a glazed-over, tech-induced coma.

To do this, we must start making key decisions about “patterns of life” (p. 37). Put simply, “If we want a better life, for ourselves and for our families, we will have to choose it — and the best way to choose it is to nudge and discipline ourselves toward the kind of life we most deeply want” (p. 37).