Thou Shalt Not Be A Jerk

by Eugene Cho     |     Book Summary


Author: Eugene Cho
Publisher: David C. Cook
Date: March 1, 2020
Pages: 272

Book Summary of Thou Shalt Not Be A Jerk by Eugene Cho


It seems that our political climate is becoming ever more polarized and heated. As Christians sometimes find one another at different ends of the political spectrum, engaging with politics can become fraught with difficulty and is potentially even divisive.

What should we do? 

  • Should we stick to a few main issues and speak out loudly on those? 
  • Should we broaden the issues we talk about? 
  • Should we stand our ground? 
  • Is it better to simply disengage from politics altogether, to get on with preaching Jesus to a world that needs Him?

A Christian is called to love both God and neighbor. This means that we can’t disengage from politics. Quite the opposite, actually. “Politics matter because politics impact policies that affect people” (p. 230), and those people matter deeply to God.

Let us consider how to allow that love for others to permeate our whole approach to political engagement. It will help us to:

  • Find common ground with those with whom we disagree.
  • Listen to one another attentively.
  • Express our relationship with Jesus even as we pray, vote, and speak out when necessary.

Politics can often be a turn-off, but Christ-like politics needn’t be!





Thou Shalt Not Be A Jerk

by Eugene Cho

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Thou Shalt Not Be A Jerk by Eugene Cho

AuthorEugene Cho
PublisherDavid C. Cook
DateMarch 1, 2020
Pages272


Overview:

It seems that our political climate is becoming ever more polarized and heated. As Christians sometimes find one another at different ends of the political spectrum, engaging with politics can become fraught with difficulty and is potentially even divisive.

What should we do? 

  • Should we stick to a few main issues and speak out loudly on those? 
  • Should we broaden the issues we talk about? 
  • Should we stand our ground? 
  • Is it better to simply disengage from politics altogether, to get on with preaching Jesus to a world that needs Him?

A Christian is called to love both God and neighbor. This means that we can’t disengage from politics. Quite the opposite, actually. “Politics matter because politics impact policies that affect people” (p. 230), and those people matter deeply to God.

Let us consider how to allow that love for others to permeate our whole approach to political engagement. It will help us to:

  • Find common ground with those with whom we disagree.
  • Listen to one another attentively.
  • Express our relationship with Jesus even as we pray, vote, and speak out when necessary.

Politics can often be a turn-off, but Christ-like politics needn’t be!