Watching TV Religiously

by Kutter Callaway with Dean Batali     |     Book Summary


Author: Kutter Callaway with Dean Batali
Publisher: Baker Academic
Date: 2016
Pages: 269

Book Summary of Watching TV Religiously by Kutter Callaway with Dean Batali


In the 21st century, television is “the dominant storytelling medium… It is both our preferred and most pervasive means for telling ourselves stories—about ourselves” (p. 4). This means that we must understand television to understand American culture. It also means that we must understand television to speak intelligibly to American people.  

With the aim of cultural and missional engagement, this book seeks to “offer an exploration of the theological significance of the medium of TV and the contemporary practice of TV watching” (p. 5). This exploration involves three closely related objectives:

  1. We need a set of “analytical tools” (p. 5) that will enable us to engage with TV as a medium. 
  2. We need a process of “theological reflection” (p. 6) that will enable us to see how God might be at work in and through TV.
  3. We need a “theology of television” (p. 6) that will enable us to appreciate and evaluate TV.

The inescapable reality is the fact that TV is deeply embedded in American culture. There is virtually no escaping this medium. Since TV is “one of the primary means through which contemporary persons make sense of their lives and the world” (p. 195), we must understand the power of this medium.





Watching TV Religiously

by Kutter Callaway with Dean Batali

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Watching TV Religiously by Kutter Callaway with Dean Batali

AuthorKutter Callaway with Dean Batali
PublisherBaker Academic
Date2016
Pages269


Overview:

In the 21st century, television is “the dominant storytelling medium… It is both our preferred and most pervasive means for telling ourselves stories—about ourselves” (p. 4). This means that we must understand television to understand American culture. It also means that we must understand television to speak intelligibly to American people.  

With the aim of cultural and missional engagement, this book seeks to “offer an exploration of the theological significance of the medium of TV and the contemporary practice of TV watching” (p. 5). This exploration involves three closely related objectives:

  1. We need a set of “analytical tools” (p. 5) that will enable us to engage with TV as a medium. 
  2. We need a process of “theological reflection” (p. 6) that will enable us to see how God might be at work in and through TV.
  3. We need a “theology of television” (p. 6) that will enable us to appreciate and evaluate TV.

The inescapable reality is the fact that TV is deeply embedded in American culture. There is virtually no escaping this medium. Since TV is “one of the primary means through which contemporary persons make sense of their lives and the world” (p. 195), we must understand the power of this medium.




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