When Is It Right to Die?

by Joni Eareckson Tada     |     Book Summary


Author: Joni Eareckson Tada
Publisher: Zondervan
Date: February 22, 2018
Pages: 208

Book Summary of When Is It Right to Die by Joni Eareckson Tada


Our culture creates the illusion that a life lived with value is suffering-free and happy and that any other life is lived without meaning. Death, especially the process of dying, is taboo.

So, we fear death. We fear dependence, we fear pain, and to some extent we even fear those who are dependent and in pain. They remind us of the uncomfortable truth: we are mortal, and one day we may experience the same.

Feeding off of this fear, the drive to legalize and liberalize euthanasia grows stronger. Rhetoric is cleverly employed to make the act of killing oneself or another sound far less horrifying, perhaps even good.

The questions raised by end of life or disability issues are deep. We are speaking of people in utter despair, struggling with some of the hardest experiences imaginable. The biggest question of all is What makes life worth living? The answer, it turns out, isn’t found in arguments and information, but in people. When society is prepared to love by doing the hard work of caring, life is worth it. 

Most of all, it is found in a Person, who teaches us most supremely how to love and care for others.





When Is It Right to Die?

by Joni Eareckson Tada

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of When Is It Right to Die by Joni Eareckson Tada

AuthorJoni Eareckson Tada
PublisherZondervan
DateFebruary 22, 2018
Pages208


Overview:

Our culture creates the illusion that a life lived with value is suffering-free and happy and that any other life is lived without meaning. Death, especially the process of dying, is taboo.

So, we fear death. We fear dependence, we fear pain, and to some extent we even fear those who are dependent and in pain. They remind us of the uncomfortable truth: we are mortal, and one day we may experience the same.

Feeding off of this fear, the drive to legalize and liberalize euthanasia grows stronger. Rhetoric is cleverly employed to make the act of killing oneself or another sound far less horrifying, perhaps even good.

The questions raised by end of life or disability issues are deep. We are speaking of people in utter despair, struggling with some of the hardest experiences imaginable. The biggest question of all is What makes life worth living? The answer, it turns out, isn’t found in arguments and information, but in people. When society is prepared to love by doing the hard work of caring, life is worth it. 

Most of all, it is found in a Person, who teaches us most supremely how to love and care for others.




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