Wordsmithy

by Douglas Wilson     |     Book Summary


Author: Douglas Wilson
Publisher: Canon Press
Date: November 16, 2011
Pages: 120

Book Summary of Wordsmithy by Douglas Wilson


Black symbols on white paper convey meaning. That meaning can be imparted with excellence in ways that compel readers to grow in knowledge, respond to it, and enjoy the learning process all at once.

As a blacksmith heats iron and hammers it into something of use, so the author shapes and molds words and phrases such that he becomes a wordsmith. The writer’s experiences and knowledge are the iron to be formed into her blog post, haiku, or book.

Who, then, should write? How should they write? How do they blossom into writers worth reading? These are all questions every budding author needs to consider. It’s one thing to write a content-driven college paper using a 3 to 1 ratio of technical jargon to fluff. It is quite another to share wisdom in both a unique and enjoyable way while maintaining the truthfulness of God’s Word.

Anyone who is called to write must become a wordsmith. We must not merely use words in any old, boring way. Rather, wordsmiths learn to savor, treasure, and craft words to bring delight to their readers. In a word, writers must become wordsmithy.





Wordsmithy

by Douglas Wilson

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Wordsmithy by Douglas Wilson

AuthorDouglas Wilson
PublisherCanon Press
DateNovember 16, 2011
Pages120


Overview:

Black symbols on white paper convey meaning. That meaning can be imparted with excellence in ways that compel readers to grow in knowledge, respond to it, and enjoy the learning process all at once.

As a blacksmith heats iron and hammers it into something of use, so the author shapes and molds words and phrases such that he becomes a wordsmith. The writer’s experiences and knowledge are the iron to be formed into her blog post, haiku, or book.

Who, then, should write? How should they write? How do they blossom into writers worth reading? These are all questions every budding author needs to consider. It’s one thing to write a content-driven college paper using a 3 to 1 ratio of technical jargon to fluff. It is quite another to share wisdom in both a unique and enjoyable way while maintaining the truthfulness of God’s Word.

Anyone who is called to write must become a wordsmith. We must not merely use words in any old, boring way. Rather, wordsmiths learn to savor, treasure, and craft words to bring delight to their readers. In a word, writers must become wordsmithy.