Jesus, Lover of My Soul

by Julian Hardyman     |     Book Summary


Author: Julian Hardyman
Publisher: IVP
Date: 19 Nov 2020
Pages: 197

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


God is love (1 Jo. 4:8). This is a precious truth. God loves us in Christ. This is even more precious. But what does God’s love for us look like?

The Bible presents us with wonderful pictures. He is a Father. We know and love this image, but there is another: God is a Lover. Specifically, Jesus is the bridegroom and we, His people, are His bride. This is less familiar, though it flows through Scripture, and has comforted Christians for centuries. In fact, it may be the reason the Song of Songs is in the Bible.

The 20th century revival of preaching the Song overlooked the spiritual dynamics of the book pointing both to human love and beyond to God’s relationship with His people. Yet, Jesus comes towards us in the Song with passionate desire. If we allow ourselves to hear, His voice calls to us with longing: “Let me see your face” (Son. 2:14).

Let us dwell on God as lover “because Jesus as Lover of our souls is one of the great pictures God has given us for his love, and because it has great power to take us deeper in our relationship with him” (p. 9).





Jesus, Lover of My Soul

by Julian Hardyman

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author Julian Hardyman
Publisher IVP
Date 19 Nov 2020
Pages 197


Overview:

God is love (1 Jo. 4:8). This is a precious truth. God loves us in Christ. This is even more precious. But what does God’s love for us look like?

The Bible presents us with wonderful pictures. He is a Father. We know and love this image, but there is another: God is a Lover. Specifically, Jesus is the bridegroom and we, His people, are His bride. This is less familiar, though it flows through Scripture, and has comforted Christians for centuries. In fact, it may be the reason the Song of Songs is in the Bible.

The 20th century revival of preaching the Song overlooked the spiritual dynamics of the book pointing both to human love and beyond to God’s relationship with His people. Yet, Jesus comes towards us in the Song with passionate desire. If we allow ourselves to hear, His voice calls to us with longing: “Let me see your face” (Son. 2:14).

Let us dwell on God as lover “because Jesus as Lover of our souls is one of the great pictures God has given us for his love, and because it has great power to take us deeper in our relationship with him” (p. 9).