Overrated

by Eugene Cho     |     Book Summary


Author: Eugene Cho
Publisher: David C. Cook
Date: 2014
Pages: 238

Book Summary of Overrated by Eugene Cho


Eugene Cho is on a mission. It’s a mission of honesty and transparency. In his words, it’s his confession. Without employing guilt and shame as motivators, Overrated describes an issue that is all too common in the church today: loving the idea of changing the world more than actually taking steps to be a part of that change. 

A passionate call to action, coupled with a number of practical ways to be engaged, flow throughout the pages. It’s easier to hashtag or announce a desire to bring change in a global way than to be involved in making a difference in one’s local community.  Through poignant anecdotes, the reader is taken on a journey of brutal honesty and a serious call to follow Micah 6:8, “to do justice, and to love kindness.”

The idea of changing the world is compelling to any Christian, but this must start with a position of humility, where the believer understands that change must start from within. 

Some of the more pertinent issues covered include: why justice matters, the tension caused by upward mobility, and asking hard questions before jumping into attempts to solve a problem superficially.





Overrated

by Eugene Cho

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Overrated by Eugene Cho

AuthorEugene Cho
PublisherDavid C. Cook
Date2014
Pages238


Overview:

Eugene Cho is on a mission. It’s a mission of honesty and transparency. In his words, it’s his confession. Without employing guilt and shame as motivators, Overrated describes an issue that is all too common in the church today: loving the idea of changing the world more than actually taking steps to be a part of that change. 

A passionate call to action, coupled with a number of practical ways to be engaged, flow throughout the pages. It’s easier to hashtag or announce a desire to bring change in a global way than to be involved in making a difference in one’s local community.  Through poignant anecdotes, the reader is taken on a journey of brutal honesty and a serious call to follow Micah 6:8, “to do justice, and to love kindness.”

The idea of changing the world is compelling to any Christian, but this must start with a position of humility, where the believer understands that change must start from within. 

Some of the more pertinent issues covered include: why justice matters, the tension caused by upward mobility, and asking hard questions before jumping into attempts to solve a problem superficially.




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