Rejoicing in Christ

by Michael Reeves     |     Book Summary


Author: Michael Reeves
Publisher: IVP Academic
Date: 2015
Pages: 135

Book Summary of Rejoicing in Christ by Michael Reeves


Visit your local Christian bookstore, and you’ll find thousands of Christian books. Do a quick internet search, and you’ll find tens of thousands more. Among the recently published titles you might notice that the vast majority of these books are about the reader. These are the books that sell. People want to read something practical with life application. The American pragmatist longs for a to-do-list with five easy steps.

Dig a bit deeper on the shelf, or click to the next page of search results, and you may begin to discover books about theological concepts like grace, the cross, church, worldview, the Bible, or the gospel. While each of these topics is important and worthwhile, these topics often get “abstracted from Jesus” (p. 10).

The great need today is not for another Christian book. Rather, the great need today is for more books about Christ. “This book, then, aims for something deeper than a new technique or a call to action: to consider Christ, that he might become more central for you, that you might know him better, treasure him more and enter into his joy.” (p. 11)





Rejoicing in Christ

by Michael Reeves

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Rejoicing in Christ by Michael Reeves

AuthorMichael Reeves
PublisherIVP Academic
Date2015
Pages135


Overview:

Visit your local Christian bookstore, and you’ll find thousands of Christian books. Do a quick internet search, and you’ll find tens of thousands more. Among the recently published titles you might notice that the vast majority of these books are about the reader. These are the books that sell. People want to read something practical with life application. The American pragmatist longs for a to-do-list with five easy steps.

Dig a bit deeper on the shelf, or click to the next page of search results, and you may begin to discover books about theological concepts like grace, the cross, church, worldview, the Bible, or the gospel. While each of these topics is important and worthwhile, these topics often get “abstracted from Jesus” (p. 10).

The great need today is not for another Christian book. Rather, the great need today is for more books about Christ. “This book, then, aims for something deeper than a new technique or a call to action: to consider Christ, that he might become more central for you, that you might know him better, treasure him more and enter into his joy.” (p. 11)