Sermons of the Great Ejection

by Iain H. Murray     |     Book Summary


Author: Iain H. Murray
Publisher: Banner of Truth Trust
Date: 2012 (revised; original 1962)
Pages: 294

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

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The effects of the Great Ejection reach far beyond the year of 1662, spanning across three different centuries. “The Act of Uniformity, which silenced the vast majority of England’s evangelical preachers, was no sudden act of kingly folly or parliamentary misgovernment; rather it was the turning point in a great and long-drawn-out struggle.” (p. vii) Just like the preceding efforts of the Reformation, this 24th of August, also known as Black Bartholomew’s Day, would forever impact the history of the church.

This small collection of farewell sermons shows the heart and true motives behind the ministers in their decisions of nonconformity. In their own words, they tell us that it was never about themselves or their own opinions but that they believed their position to be not only a requirement of their consciences but of God Himself. They gave up all for the sake of the gospel that was at risk of being lost. 

These ejected Puritan ministers would continue to be persecuted by those who would silence them for many years to come. Some of them even lost their lives or were imprisoned to keep them from preaching. So it remains for Puritanism even to this day.

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Sermons of the Great Ejection

by Iain H. Murray

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author Iain H. Murray
Publisher Banner of Truth Trust
Date 2012 (revised; original 1962)
Pages 294


Download Book Brief

Overview:

The effects of the Great Ejection reach far beyond the year of 1662, spanning across three different centuries. “The Act of Uniformity, which silenced the vast majority of England’s evangelical preachers, was no sudden act of kingly folly or parliamentary misgovernment; rather it was the turning point in a great and long-drawn-out struggle.” (p. vii) Just like the preceding efforts of the Reformation, this 24th of August, also known as Black Bartholomew’s Day, would forever impact the history of the church.

This small collection of farewell sermons shows the heart and true motives behind the ministers in their decisions of nonconformity. In their own words, they tell us that it was never about themselves or their own opinions but that they believed their position to be not only a requirement of their consciences but of God Himself. They gave up all for the sake of the gospel that was at risk of being lost. 

These ejected Puritan ministers would continue to be persecuted by those who would silence them for many years to come. Some of them even lost their lives or were imprisoned to keep them from preaching. So it remains for Puritanism even to this day.



Download Book Brief