Treatise on Good Works

by Martin Luther; annotated study edition by Timothy J. Wengert     |     Book Summary


Author: Martin Luther; annotated study edition by Timothy J. Wengert
Publisher: 1517 Media; Fortress Press
Date: 01 June 2016
Pages: 116

Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne


How should we understand the Christian’s relationship with good deeds? Do good works contribute anything to a Christian’s salvation? If not, then why do they form such an important part of the Christian life?

In the 16th century, questions like this were quite literally world-changing. Even today, they remain life-changing. Into a world which laid demands and commands on ordinary Christian people requiring them to live in certain ways, to fulfill certain rituals, and to please certain authorities to have even a shaky assurance of salvation, Luther’s voice rang as a clarion call to biblical faith.

It is faith that is so transformative, and, says Luther, good works must spring from faith. Without faith, works are no good. With faith, however, good works are to be found, done, and enjoyed, in every aspect of every day, not simply in so-called high and holy places.

“Luther’s main goal was to commend a new, down-to-earth piety to all Christians.” (p. 257) This was an easily misunderstood message then, and it remains easily misunderstood today, but Luther’s radical message still has the power to transform our lives and the way we live them.





Treatise on Good Works

by Martin Luther; annotated study edition by Timothy J. Wengert

[ Book Summary ]



Book Summary of Union With Christ by Rankin Wilbourne

Author Martin Luther; annotated study edition by Timothy J. Wengert
Publisher 1517 Media; Fortress Press
Date 01 June 2016
Pages 116


Overview:

How should we understand the Christian’s relationship with good deeds? Do good works contribute anything to a Christian’s salvation? If not, then why do they form such an important part of the Christian life?

In the 16th century, questions like this were quite literally world-changing. Even today, they remain life-changing. Into a world which laid demands and commands on ordinary Christian people requiring them to live in certain ways, to fulfill certain rituals, and to please certain authorities to have even a shaky assurance of salvation, Luther’s voice rang as a clarion call to biblical faith.

It is faith that is so transformative, and, says Luther, good works must spring from faith. Without faith, works are no good. With faith, however, good works are to be found, done, and enjoyed, in every aspect of every day, not simply in so-called high and holy places.

“Luther’s main goal was to commend a new, down-to-earth piety to all Christians.” (p. 257) This was an easily misunderstood message then, and it remains easily misunderstood today, but Luther’s radical message still has the power to transform our lives and the way we live them.